Assessment 2

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  • What are the key findings you have discovered during this phase?

References

ABC News. (2017). Fast fashion: Rivers turning blue and 500,000 tonnes in landfill. Retrieved from https://www.abc.net.au/news/

Bain, S. (2016, April 16). Is H&M misleading customers with all its talk of sustainability? [Blog post] Retrieved from https://qz.com/662031/is-hm-misleading-customers-with-all-its-talk-of-sustainability/

Brancatisano, E. (2017). Clothing giant vows. Retrieved from https://www.huffingtonpost.com.au/2017/04/04/clothing-giant-handm-vows-to-use-only-sustainable-materials-by-203_a_22026064/

H&M. (2018). H&M debuts Conscious Exclusive collection. Retrieved from https://about.hm.com/en/media/news

K, S. (2018). 8 shocking facts that show how unethical fast fashion companies are ruining the fashion industries. Retrieved from https://made-to-measure-suits.bgfashion.net

Leo, K. (2017, March 22). Everything Wrong With H&M. [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jAgq74QCWpA 

Milburn, J. (2016). Aussies send 85% of textiles to landfill. Retrieved from https://textilebeat.com/aussies-send-85-of-textiles-to-landfill/

Siegle, L. (2016). Am I a fool to expect more than corporate greenwashing? Retrieved from https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/apr/03/rana-plaza-campaign-handm-recycling

University of Queensland Australia. (2018). Fast fashion quick to cause environmental havoc. Retrieved from https://sustainability.uq.edu.au

Wicker, A. (2016). Fast Fashion Is Creating an Environmental Crisis. Retrieved from https://www.newsweek.com/2016/09/09/old-clothes-fashion-waste-crisis-494824.html

  • Create at least one infographic that represents unique insights into the project challenge.

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  • Provide evidence of all of the research tools that the you used. For example; storyboarding, journey maps, interviews, photos of workshops, notes etc.

Please see below 5 Key Findings youtube vide for references.

The infographic uses personal findings based on questions asked to 8 individual people that participated in a survey.

Using the information collated during secondary research as well as the survey, I created an Empathy map.

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Which matters most? I find the environmental impact and ultimately, the suffering humankind will endure due to the negative impacts on the environmental the most important.

Which should we act on first? We first must act upon the 80% of donated clothing that is sent to landfill. We need to create a tool that will help solve this issue.

What is feasible? It’s feasible to minimise the amount of clothes sent to waste, however, it is impossible to eliminate it. We require a solution that will remove most of the clothes sent to landfill, so our solution needs to be geared towards many levels of clothing quality. Unfortunately, some clothes will be too low quality to save, but if our solution can make use of this then we can begin to make a large, positive impact.

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WHAT is the problem? Clearly state the challenge statement.

The fast fashion industry is pushing out new collections every single week and consumers can’t keep up. The new trend goes as quickly as it came and that leaves us consumers sorting through our clothes and saying, “I have nothing to wear.” So you buy more and donate whatever isn’t serving you anymore – thinking to yourself that you’re just glad your trash can become someone’s treasure; someone who actually needs it. But then, you find out that 80% of the clothes donated are sent to landfill anyway. This is a major issue as clothes sent to landfill can sit there for 200 or more years (McCarthy, 2018), and methane – a far more serious greenhouse gas than carbon – is emitted into the air as the clothes decompose (McCarthy, 2018).

WHY is it happening? Students must validate their statement with their research findings.

This is happening because charities are receiving an overwhelming amount of clothes that don’t sell. So charities “bale up” the remaining unwanted clothing and sell them to textile recyclers (Wicker, 2016). In discussion with an employee at Saint Vincent De Pauls it was found that a large portion of the items that did not sell were of high quality, but were outdated and thus hard to sell. There was also a considerable amount of clothing that were of low quality from fast fashion brands such as H&M. These low quality items have the potential to be upcycled into rags, sound-absorption materials, insulation or stuffing (Sustainability Victoria, n.d.), however, little is known about what textile recycling giants do with the finished product. Research has found that less than 1% of collected clothing is recycled into new yarns and fibres (McCarthy, 2018). While new technology that will make recycling textiles more accessible is in the works , it still has a long way to go (McCarthy, 2018).

The root cause of this issue is the profit-driven practices of the fast fashion giants. The most important take away is for consumers to be more conscious of where they buy their clothes from and to be educated and aware of their choices and how it will impact the environment beginning from how it was made, how it came into your hands and how it is disposed of.

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So how might we bring fashion to people without putting the planet in jeopardy?

A fashion label that uses only deadstock to create new clothes. The label will make use of the clothing that does not sell at charity organisations and thus, preventing the amount of clothing that is sent to landfill. Since many items are sellable, but simply outdated, the label will work to upcycle clothing and create a new take on a piece by altering its shape and cut. These clothes will be upcycled and sold in the country they are collected in to ensure minimal environmental impact involved in transportation of resources, materials and products. Clothing manufactured in the country they are sold in.

It’s important to note that the brand – for now – will not be recycling fibre to create new clothes, but instead thinking critically and creatively to bring a piece to life that is stuck in another era. We will work with companies who are working on technology that will make recycling fibre a much more ethical and sustainable practice. Once the technology is profound, our label will incorporate more techniques to prevent fashion ending up in landfill.

The label will also work closely with charities such as women shelters by donating 20% of sales towards the charity. This is to touch on the thought of the consumer who donates their clothes in the first place who does so to help someone in need.

Items that are unable to be upcycled due to poor quality will be collected and donated to charities who work with families that are unable to afford things such as cleaning products.

WHO is the audience? Students must state which audience will benefit from their solution to the challenge statement.

The audience for this project is the persona created in the empathy map during Stage One: Discover. It is for the people who love fashion and view it as a tool for self-expression, creativity and confidence, but care deeply for the world they call home. These customers want to make a statement with their buying patterns and want to ensure their choices have a minimal negative effect on the planet –  even reducing the negative impact of clothing that sits in landfill untouched and rotting.

In order to put my solution to the test I’ve used The 5 Whys.

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References

ABC News. (2017). Fast fashion: Rivers turning blue and 500,000 tonnes in landfill. Retrieved from https://www.abc.net.au/news/

Bain, S. (2016, April 16). Is H&M misleading customers with all its talk of sustainability? [Blog post] Retrieved from https://qz.com/662031/is-hm-misleading-customers-with-all-its-talk-of-sustainability/

CBS News. (2006). Salt-Water Fish Extinction Seen By 2048. Retrieved by https://www.cbsnews.com/news/salt-water-fish-extinction-seen-by-2048/

H&M. (2018). H&M debuts Conscious Exclusive collection. Retrieved from https://about.hm.com/en/media/news

K, S. (2018). 8 shocking facts that show how unethical fast fashion companies are ruining the fashion industries. Retrieved from https://made-to-measure-suits.bgfashion.net

McCarthy, A. (2018). Are Our Clothes Doomed for the Landfill? Retrieved from 
https://remake.world/stories/news/are-our-clothes-doomed-for-the-landfill/

Milburn, J. (2016). Aussies send 85% of textiles to landfill. Retrieved from https://textilebeat.com/aussies-send-85-of-textiles-to-landfill/

NASA. (2019). Climate Change: Vital Signs of the Planet. Retrieved from  https://climate.nasa.gov/effects/

Sustainability Victoria. (n.d.) How to reduce, reuse and recycle your unwanted clothing. Retrieved from https://www.sustainability.vic.gov.au/You-and-your-home/Waste-and-recycling/Furniture-and-household-items/Clothing

Siegle, L. (2016). Am I a fool to expect more than corporate greenwashing? Retrieved from https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/apr/03/rana-plaza-campaign-handm-recycling

U.S. National Library of Medicine. (2017) Methane: Your Environment, Your Health. Retrieved from https://toxtown.nlm.nih.gov/chemicals-and-contaminants/methane

University of Cambridge. (2001). The Climate Change Benefits of Reducing Methane Emissions. Retrieved from https://www.jbs.cam.ac.uk/fileadmin/user_upload/research/workingpapers/wp0113.pdf

University of Queensland Australia. (2018). Fast fashion quick to cause environmental havoc. Retrieved from https://sustainability.uq.edu.au

Wicker, A. (2016). Fast Fashion Is Creating an Environmental Crisis. Retrieved from https://www.newsweek.com/2016/09/09/old-clothes-fashion-waste-crisis-494824.html

Angelina Watson